Victoria Road
Download a list of residents of this street for 1920

This road stretched from Lichfield road to Six Ways at one end Victoria road police station which used to be the Aston Manor law courts, Victoria Playhouse, the swimming baths were they used to use for treating people with impetigo, which was a chemical bath of a white solution. nasty but necessary during those days. Opposite the baths a delicious faggot and peas shop, selling tripe chicklings and all types of cooked foods,just ideal after a session in the swimming baths.

Victoria Road Police Station
Victoria Road Police Station
Picture Courtesy Colin Richards

This road stretched from Lichfield road to Six Ways at one end Victoria road police station which used to be the Aston Manor law courts, Victoria Playhouse, the swimming baths were they used to use for treating people with impetigo, which was a chemical bath of a white solution. nasty but necessary during those days. Opposite the baths a delicious faggot and peas shop, selling tripe chicklings and all types of cooked foods,just ideal after a session in the swimming baths.

Victoria Road Salvation Army Band
Victoria Road Salvation Army Band

Victoria Road c1947
Victoria Road c1947
This group of children are waiting outside of the Aston & District Labour Club
Victoria Road for a tram to take them to the Lickey Hills

Victoria Road Salvation Army Band
Julias Silverman MP
He campaigned from Aston & District Labour Club c1965

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Memories of Victoria Road

I lived in Aston from 1943-62 above a shop at 120 Park Road. Our entrance was up an alley in Victoria Road, right next to the Victora Picture House. I went to Vicarage Road Infancts and Junior Schools. Then went up market for a couple of awful years to Greenmore College (don't ask!) and ended happily at Great Barr Comprehensive. Frank Lilley's tobacconist shop was across the street and his wife ran the sweet shop next door. Both played a big part in my life, collecting Beano and Dandy and satin cushions in a triangular bag.
Whenever I smell beer brewing anywhere I am transported to childhood again and Aston Cross - and the library and the awful pork butchers on the corner where my mother me the piggies were going for their holidays! My mother cleaned at Aston police station and washed bottles at Beechams Chemist on the corner of Park and Victoria and worked at the sheet metal factory further up Victora Road which may have been called Stevenson's
Annie Howes

My mom lived on Vicarage Rd Aston, her name was Rose Bailey, her sisters names were Audrey and Marjorie Bailey, she had 2 brothers Ron and Ken Bailey. Her mothers name was also Rose Bailey and fathers name was Bill Bailey, he was a chimneysweeper, i wondered if anyone knew of them? the address was 1 back of 90 Vicarage Rd. Would love to hear from anyone who knew them. Around the 1940`s i think.
Mel Gun

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Victoria Road Swimming Baths by Peter Walker

Victoria Road Baths opened on 5th Oct 1892

A wooden floor could be layed over the baths in the Winter months so it could be used for gymnastic training.

Victoria Road Baths
Victoria Road Swimming Baths c1920's - Mr R Hoggins Suprintendant

Victoria Road Baths
Victoria Road Baths - Thanks to Tony Goodwin for this picture

Victoria Road Baths
Victoria Road Baths

Victoria Road Baths
Club Captain Francis B Daniell was living at number 76 Victoria Road in 1901

Victoria Road Baths
Victoria Road Baths

Victoria Road Baths
Victoria Road Baths

Victoria Road Baths
Victoria Road Baths

I well remember going there from school every week- that was Aston grammar, which had a gate almost opposite the back entrance to the Baths in Albert Road. I hated swimming after an experience in Kingstanding Baths when I was six, and was a bit sickly too, so I usually had to join the 'wallflowers' as the teacher called us, sitting on the balcony over the changing cubicles, where we had to read improving books. That was from about 1946 I think. I started at the school in 1944, and I don't think they let us schoolkids in at that time

 

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